[email protected]
www.wyocan.org
www.cyberwyoming.org/alliance
307.314.2188, PO Box 2332, Laramie, WY 82073

Dubai World Expo 2020 Committee Scam:

If an email has language that is too formal and was obviously written by someone with English as their second language, then be very wary. An example is from the Laramie citizen reported email which had the language “stand as my partner to receive my share of gratification from foreign companies.” The email was from a real website’s contact me email address for the Center for Environment and Geographic Information Services in Bangladesh, and the citizen wasn’t quite sure what that organization had to do with the World Expo Committee in Dubai.

Humanitarian Mission Scam:

‘Alicia Collins’ is back, according to a Laramie citizen. The same citizen reported another dying widow scam from ‘Alicia Collins’ in November. This time, the email about Alicia Collin’s dire request for help with her finances to aid orphans, was forwarded by Association Montarnissimo ([email protected]) instead of directly from Alicia’s email address.

Suspicious Verizon Text Offer:

A Big Horn citizen reported a text message impersonating Verizon that said “VZON Free Msg: January bill is paid. Thanks, Here’s a little gift for you: [link].” The citizen followed the link and it turned out to be a ‘good deal’ on a Samsung watch. But the citizen got suspicious (GOOD JOB), called Verizon to confirm it was a scam, and canceled the transaction. However, the citizen did get a watch and it looked suspicious as well. CyberWyoming Note: According to PhoneArena.com this same scam occurred last September. Full article: phonearena.com/news/verizon-subscribers-need-to-watch-out-for-this-scam_id135618

Mailbox Out of Space Alert:

If you receive an email saying “Your account is on hold” because you have run out of space for your incoming email messages, look very closely at the sender’s email address ([email protected]) and do not click on the link to ‘validate again’. This email was reported by a Laramie citizen.

Prime Membership for Norton Antivirus is not Real:

Scammers often mix branding to make an offer sound legitimate. A Laramie citizen reported an email supposedly renewing Norton’s antivirus software but its greeting said ‘Hi Prime Member’ which is the wording Amazon would use. Regardless, check the sender’s email and if it is from a Gmail account like this one, don’t call the number or reply. It is always a good idea to find the real Norton site and access your account from there, never click a link.

Investment Scheme from a Real Looking Email:

If you receive an email from anyone at wbifc-globalpay.com, including a Mr. Dan Clifford, offering a broker commission to project owners who want to finance, it is a scam. There is no such website and the fact that they are offering ‘broker’ commissions to non-brokers, means they are violating all sorts of laws. Reported by a Laramie citizen.

More Linked In Email Scams Reported:

About a year ago, data was scraped from LinkedIn, including email addresses. Watch for fake emails that use the LinkedIn wording, “You appeared in 9 searches this week.” The Who’s Looking button and the download the app link could be dangerous. Don’t click on them. The latest one was reported by a Laramie citizen and it came from [email protected]. (Long email addresses like this are almost always suspicious.)

Don’t use these passwords:

A wonderful graphic from InformationisBeautiful.net shows the top 500 passwords not to use. Names, number sequences, and single words seem to be the most common. This tip is from the Wyoming ISSA (Information Systems Security Association) Chapter. informationisbeautiful.net/visualizations/top-500-passwords-visualized/

Fake masks:

You may have seen official advice to use protective facemasks designated N95, KN95, and KF94. This had led to a flood of fake masks that don't provide the right level of protection. Make sure you buy your masks from a reputable manufacturer and trusted retailer. Brought to you by Scambusters.org.

New QuickBooks Payment Scam:

Phishing criminals are using QuickBooks’ popularity to send invoices that may look like they are coming from a legitimate vendor, but using basic Quickbooks invoice format. The scammers are asking for bank account details for ACH (automated clearing house) payments. Brought to you by KnowBe4’s Cyber Heist News.

Please report scams you may experience to [email protected] to alert your friends and neighbors.

Other ways to report a scam:

  • Better Business Bureau Scam Tracker: bbb.org/scamtracker/us/reportscam
  • Wyoming Attorney General’s Office, Consumer Protection 307-777-6397, 800-438-5799 or [email protected]
  • File a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission at ftccomplaintassistant.gov
  • Report your scam to the FBI at www.ic3.gov/complaint
  • Reported unwanted calls to the Federal Trade Commission’s Do Not Call Registration. Online at donotcall.gov/report.html or call 1-888-382-1222, option 3
  • Office of the Inspector General: oig.ssa.gov
  • AARP Fraud Watch Network (any age welcome) Helpline 877-908-3360
  • IRS: report email scams impersonating the IRS to [email protected]
  • Call the Wyoming Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP) for assistance with potential Medicare fraud, abuse, or errors at 1 800 856-4398
  • Victim Support: The AARP Fraud Watch Network and Volunteers of America (VOA) created a new, free program to provide emotional support for people impacted by a scam or fraud, called ReST. Visit www.aarp.org/fraudsupport to learn more about the free program and register

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